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Port Mann Bridge Replacement ‘Uncorks Vancouver’s Worst Bottleneck’

By: 
Bill Cramer

British Columbia’s Transportation Investment Corporation has reduced travel times along the busy Port Mann/Highway 1 corridor by up to 50 percent, saving drivers an hour per daily commute, with a regional infrastructure project that included replacement of the Port Mann Bridge.

The original bridge opened in 1964 and, by the early 2000s, it was congested in both directions for more than 14 hours per day. After extensive consultation, the majority of drivers said they would support a toll to pay for a new bridge and highway. The Port Mann is the second-longest cable-stayed bridge in North America, and was the widest bridge in the world when it first opened.

“We have effectively uncorked the worst bottleneck in Metro Vancouver,” said Michael Proudfoot, CEO of the Transportation Investment Corporation. The Port Mann Bridge is “an architectural marvel, and the link that facilitates this region’s commerce and transportation.”

Learn more about Vancouver’s Port Mann/Highway 1 Improvement Project.